Summer Reading: Spinster

“Are women people yet?” Kate Bolick writes at the end of Spinster: Making A Life Of One’s Own. This question is not one that drives the text, but a striking one that it arrives at and that lingers after the book is closed.

For most of Spinster, Bolick weaves together her discovery of five women writers and how her initial connection with them, then a re-examined one, changed her outlook on marriage, relationships, and selfhood. Bolick sets up her cultural and personal history by approaching the term “spinster” and her “spinster wish,” a not uncommon desire for self-sufficiency and success.

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Summer Reading: Between the World and Me

I’ve never walked by a police officer and felt fear for my body. I’ve grown up “white,” in a “white” suburb, attended a “white” high school and gone to a “white” college where reading James Baldwin was seen as some great act of diversity. I knew and know all of this. I know that I can walk into the lobby of a building and enter the elevators without checking in with doorman.

I’m part of The Dream that Ta-Nehisi Coates describes in Between the World and Me, the 150-page book addressed to his 15-year-old son, Samori. To describe what Coates does in 150 pages as enlightening is unfair. It imagines that I can fully comprehend and digest the fear he lives with as a black man; it supposes that I can understand what it means to have an ideal world out of my reach and built upon the bodies of me and those I grew up with; it suggests I know what it means to be diluted into nothing more than race.

To say Between the World and Me is powerful is an understatement. Again and again I was made to think with a story or idea, which were made all the stronger by the frightening ease with which Coates translates experience into text. This book that says, “racism is a visceral experience,” that says that white people “are, like us, a modern invention,” (10, 7) is something special. Like the current wave of police brutality, many of Coates’s ideas are not new, but they are from today, existing in now and speak to a world that too many people – myself included – are not looking at.

What sold me most on the need that everyone read this book is two-fold: Coates’s acknowledgement that this is the American experience, and his approach to gender. Late in the book, Coates speaks of traveling to Paris. “France is built on its own dream,” he writes (127). Coates does not take on the entire world, but the world that he and his son and his wife and his friends live in.

Via NPR

Via NPR

Coates writes to his son: “The women around you must be responsible for their bodies in a way that you will never know” (71). Again, Coates does what impresses me most: he does not speak for others; he doesn’t pretend to explore the experience of being a black woman. To put it poorly, he doesn’t bite off more than he can chew. But he still creates a vision that extends beyond him.

This book was not written for me. Coates is not speaking to me; he is not writing for my sake. To put it in his own words, he shouldn’t have to: “The Dreamers will have to learn to struggle themselves, to understand that the field for their Dream, the stage where they have painted themselves white, is the deathbed of us all” (151). But I – and many others I know – need Coates and need this book. Blinded by The Dream, we are incapable of learning the reality of our lives.

So go and read this book.

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Summer Reading: Fangirl

I’m so glad I’m now a Rainbow Powell fangirl. Before I read Powell’s 2013 book Fangirl, I was expecting a romantic YA with cute nerd girl who quickly becomes the crush of cute nerd guy. Based on that, I’m not even sure why I picked up the book. Well, its constant appearance on my Instagram feed was certainly one reason, as was the idea of fandom.

While I waited too long to read Fangirl, I’m glad I did because my reading of it coincided with my first trip to the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. A perfect and happy coincidence, since the book focuses on Cather, a college freshman and a super fan of the Simon Snow series, which in this book world is the equivalent of the Harry Potter mania.

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Summer Reading: In the Unlikely Event

I had to check multiple times while reading In the Unlikely Event whether it was a Young Adult novel or not. No, really, this isn’t for adults, I thought over and over.

If it isn’t obvious, I was not a fan of Judy Blume’s latest book.

via Amazon

via Amazon

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Summer Reading: My Struggle

Ever since Karl Ove Knausgaard’s books hit stateside a couple years ago, I’ve been intrigued by the Norwegian series. Knausgaard, who was already an established author, made waves in his home country then across reading realms when he released the first installation of the series in 2009 in Norway, then in 2012 in the US.

My Struggle is a literary oddity because it is a wildly successful six-volume autobiographical novel. No one writes in volumes anymore and it is bizarre — in the best way —  that in this age of listicles the public devoured thousands of pages of autobiography. But eat it up they did. Joshua Rothman in New Yorker article reviewing the third volume states that, “in Norway, one book has sold for every nine adults; as translations have proliferated, readers all over the world have fallen in love with Knausgaard.”

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